Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length

 
Advanced search

278258 Posts in 30491 Topics- by 7224 Members - Latest Member: gwl139
Pages: 1 [2]   Go Down
Print
Author Topic: Motor dies  (Read 11497 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Reckless
AKA Frankeu
Super Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Location: Barnegat
Posts: 2734



« Reply #20 on: March 22, 2008, 02:59:01 PM »

This is a very important topic! No such thing as stupid questions, just stupid answers!!!
If we were born a 100% genius we would not be here. So ask away,y your life or some one Else's could depend on the knowledge you gain here. There will be zero tolerance for wise cracks or ignorant know it alls!!!

Capt. Mike

Thank you for your response. Everyones abilities increase with positive post. I dont need to be condemned for asking a question. I want to and I am sure others want to be able to ask questions and get positive answers.

Thanks Again!!
Logged
IrishAyes
Fishing At It's Finest
Admin
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Location: Shark River
Posts: 17402



« Reply #21 on: March 22, 2008, 03:03:00 PM »

Keep asking Frankue, the only stupid question is the one not asked.   thumbsup2

No one knows everything, we can all learn from others.  I have been boating for almost 40 years and am still learning.  The day I stop learning is when I am in my grave.
« Last Edit: March 22, 2008, 03:05:13 PM by IrishAyes » Logged

Captain Joe of the Irish Ayes

May the holes in your net be no larger than the fish in it.  ~Irish Blessing
TurboDan
Sr. Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 324


« Reply #22 on: March 22, 2008, 05:29:12 PM »

Good hypothetical question lets keep it going.

What if you are motoring against the current in a river and you have to go under a bridge that has a narrow span between the abutments.  You make your approach and notice that there is a Yahoo coming full boar the other way trying to beat you through the opening what should you do?



This comes into play in the Manasquan River more than anywhere else.  The Railroad bridge as you approach the inlet gets some nasty currents and can barely fit a party boat through it.  Many people believe the rule is that whoever is going with the current has the right of way, since they have less control over their vessel.  Coincidentally, I was speaking with a USCG guy last week who told me how untrue this is.  That rule only applies in western rivers, not coastal waterways.

Additionally, he said that the proper way to approach a small opening is to motor directly in sight of the opening and proceed straight through, keeping to the right.  Many people try to cut diagonally to the opening to save time and cannot see if any larger boats are coming through.

My personal tip:  If you hear a whistle, stay the F outta there.  The Bogans plow through the RR bridge opening and you better be out of their way.  Don't blame them for doing it this way, as it's probably the safest approach instead of stopping a large vessel and risking losing control and knocking into the bridge structure.
Logged
IrishAyes
Fishing At It's Finest
Admin
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Location: Shark River
Posts: 17402



« Reply #23 on: March 22, 2008, 06:17:53 PM »

Dan, you are absolutely correct on the issue of the vessel going with the current does not having the right of way in our boating area.

This is the rule that Dan is referring to;
Notwithstanding paragraph (a)(i) and Rule 14(a), a power-driven vessel operating in narrow channels or fairways on the Great Lakes, Western Rivers, or waters specified by the Secretary , and proceeding downbound with a following current shall have the right-of-way over an upbound vessel, shall propose the manner and place of passage, and shall initiate the maneuvering signals prescribed by Rule 34(a)(i), as appropriate. The vessel proceeding upbound against the current shall hold as necessary to permit safe passing.

   I put the areas where this is applicable in bold print.  This is not the rule in any area but the above bold print areas. 

  Every day in the Shark River inlet you hear the bridge tenders telling the guys that the incoming or outbound have the right of way because of the direction of the tide.  THIS IS FALSE.  This is only a courtesy, not a rule.  Do not get caught up in thinking that you have the right of way.  If you are involved in a collision, you will find out very quickly how wrong the bridge tender was.

When you make an approach to a bridge or an obstructed area, perhaps a turn in the channel or such, it is always best to give a prolong blast on you horn.  If you do not get an answer, then you can assume the area is clear to pass and proceed with caution.  If you get an answer, assume that the other vessel is already into the area and allow him to pass thru.

Safety on the water is made, it is not a given.

Just a note...I know for a fact that there was a person who teaches classes for the Captain License course teaching this wrong.  When given the proper information, he acknowledged his error and corrected his teaching. 


« Last Edit: March 22, 2008, 06:31:22 PM by IrishAyes » Logged

Captain Joe of the Irish Ayes

May the holes in your net be no larger than the fish in it.  ~Irish Blessing
Capt. Mike
Super Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1262



WWW
« Reply #24 on: March 22, 2008, 07:25:50 PM »

Keep asking Frankue, the only stupid question is the one not asked.   thumbsup2

No one knows everything, we can all learn from others.  I have been boating for almost 40 years and am still learning.  The day I stop learning is when I am in my grave.

Well Said Capt.!!! 
Logged

Luna Sea 5
Admin
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Location: Home: Jackson NJ/Port: Toms River NJ
Posts: 12102


Nick (Luna Sea 5)


WWW
« Reply #25 on: March 22, 2008, 07:56:04 PM »

we are always here to help...  there is no such thing as a stupid question.
Logged

Fish out of Toms River NJ.
Call Nick for open boat, 973-417-5756, or on Channel 68.

Team Luna Sea 6
rugman
Super Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Location: Ringwood N.J
Posts: 2012


ARTY'S CARPET SERVICE


« Reply #26 on: March 22, 2008, 08:02:16 PM »

we are always here to help...  there is no such thing as a stupid question.
WELL SAID thumbs up thumbs up thumbs up thumbs up
Logged

Arty's Carpet Service.

For all your carpet needs RUGMAN7092@OPTONLINE.NET
ped579
NJSF Field Reporter
Super Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Location: Toms River, NJ / IBSP
Posts: 11400


Happiness is long casts, tight lines & bent rods


« Reply #27 on: March 23, 2008, 12:20:52 AM »

OK guys here is another one.  How do you determine how much of an anchor line is needed?  You can pick the depth and other variables...

Plus how much line should the average boat carry in its locker as backup?

And what is the best way to attach the line together to add to the rode?

I like playing Mr. Question...Sorry, if I become boring let me know, and I will stop.

Thanks

Paul
Logged

IN GOD WE TRUST

"Hypocrisy is not a fault these days - it is a lifestyle"

IBSP: 2064,  NJBBA: 4567

Ham Call; N2HYG Monitor RPT.  146.835
Capt. Mike
Super Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1262



WWW
« Reply #28 on: March 23, 2008, 12:31:31 AM »

Hi Paul,

At the minimum you should have on average a 5:1 scope, a 7:1 is better and a 10:1 is the best. Connection: anchor, shackle, chain, shackle, thimble, rope. Length of chain 7-15' on average should be fine, unless you are into wreck and reef anchoring.

Mike
Logged

Reckless
AKA Frankeu
Super Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Location: Barnegat
Posts: 2734



« Reply #29 on: March 23, 2008, 04:08:41 AM »

OK guys here is another one.  How do you determine how much of an anchor line is needed?  You can pick the depth and other variables...

Plus how much line should the average boat carry in its locker as backup?

And what is the best way to attach the line together to add to the rode?

I like playing Mr. Question...Sorry, if I become boring let me know, and I will stop.

Thanks

Paul

  Good question. Woke up this morning with that question on my mind. greeting
Logged
brickken
Sr. Member
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Location: Brick/Manasquan Inlet
Posts: 411


« Reply #30 on: March 23, 2008, 09:06:27 AM »

Dan, you are absolutely correct on the issue of the vessel going with the current does not having the right of way in our boating area.

This is the rule that Dan is referring to;
Notwithstanding paragraph (a)(i) and Rule 14(a), a power-driven vessel operating in narrow channels or fairways on the Great Lakes, Western Rivers, or waters specified by the Secretary , and proceeding downbound with a following current shall have the right-of-way over an upbound vessel, shall propose the manner and place of passage, and shall initiate the maneuvering signals prescribed by Rule 34(a)(i), as appropriate. The vessel proceeding upbound against the current shall hold as necessary to permit safe passing.

   I put the areas where this is applicable in bold print.  This is not the rule in any area but the above bold print areas. 

  Every day in the Shark River inlet you hear the bridge tenders telling the guys that the incoming or outbound have the right of way because of the direction of the tide.  THIS IS FALSE.  This is only a courtesy, not a rule.  Do not get caught up in thinking that you have the right of way.  If you are involved in a collision, you will find out very quickly how wrong the bridge tender was.

When you make an approach to a bridge or an obstructed area, perhaps a turn in the channel or such, it is always best to give a prolong blast on you horn.  If you do not get an answer, then you can assume the area is clear to pass and proceed with caution.  If you get an answer, assume that the other vessel is already into the area and allow him to pass thru.

Safety on the water is made, it is not a given.

Just a note...I know for a fact that there was a person who teaches classes for the Captain License course teaching this wrong.  When given the proper information, he acknowledged his error and corrected his teaching. 

I have to admit that is news to me. I was taught that the vessel with the current has the right of way.

My signature on another site that I live by is...
Many a ship at the bottom of the sea; had the right of way....and took it...
Logged

Ken

"The Taylor Vee"
Wellcraft Coastal 360
IrishAyes
Fishing At It's Finest
Admin
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Location: Shark River
Posts: 17402



« Reply #31 on: March 23, 2008, 09:29:01 AM »

Ken, there are many boaters out there that believe the same.  As I said, there was an instructor for a Captain License school who was teaching this!  It does make sense that it should be the rule, but it is not.

Paul, for your anchor question.  Capt Mike is correct in his ratios.  Conditions and your objective also come into play with this.  If you are out on a calm day and want to do some wreck fishing, you can get away with a 3:1 ratio without questions.  Use a grappling hook and you can be straight up and down on the line.  Overnight anchoring, you may need to adjust the lenght of line in the water to maintain your scope because of the tide drop/rise.  You may have to increase or decrease the scope because of the changing current also.

What all this means is; go with the rule of thumb and adjust accordingly.

Happy boating. thumbs up
Logged

Captain Joe of the Irish Ayes

May the holes in your net be no larger than the fish in it.  ~Irish Blessing
wb
Super Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Location: Matawan Creek
Posts: 5259



« Reply #32 on: March 24, 2008, 01:55:42 PM »

Also best to remember no amount of scope will make up for failing to keep a proper watch...even at anchor things can and do change.
Logged
Pages: 1 [2]   Go Up
Print
Jump to:  

Jersey Shore Boat Expo

terrafin

Heavy Duty truck Parts On Line

Web Site Design