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Author Topic: [FAQ] How does one determine how much weigh...  (Read 9384 times)
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Hotrod
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« on: April 19, 2007, 08:58:46 AM »

..he should be using when bottom fishing?

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« Last Edit: April 19, 2007, 10:18:51 AM by Hotrod » Logged



wingshooter
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« Reply #1 on: April 19, 2007, 09:15:23 AM »

not sure if its the right way but thats what works for me....

i try diferent weights untill i just hold bottom,,,all i need is to be able to jig a little and feel bottom on the downward motion,


 
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Capt. Ed
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« Reply #2 on: April 19, 2007, 09:55:26 AM »

Hi Rod,

You keep trying weights until your line is straight up and down. If there is scope in the line, it is too light. It is not good enogh to just barely feel the bottom.

After using your rod/reel combo with a certain line a while, you will know. People in our area do not use enough weight! There are a few good rod choices that can handle the weight you need to fish our waters, especially at depths greater than 40 ft. (i.e. St. Croix's Muskie rod is one of them).

Say I am drift fishing in structure on the Axel Carleson Reef out of Pt. Pleasant in 60 ft. of water or so. On my St. Croix/Shimano Tekota 500 setup with 50 lb. Power Pro I start with 8 ozs., even if it is one of those dead calm mornings. I may drop to 6 ozs. if conditions are right. Most days, I end up with 12 ozs. or more when the prevailing SE winds kick in.

Best wishes,

Capt. Ed
« Last Edit: April 19, 2007, 10:05:49 AM by Capt. Ed » Logged
IrishAyes
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« Reply #3 on: April 19, 2007, 10:46:10 AM »

I agree with Capt Ed.  When bottom fishing for sea bass, tog,etc. use enuff weight to keep your line strait up and down.  Will have to go heavy in a strong current to do that.  If your line is at an angle it will be easier to hang the wreck or rocks.  Strait up and down will eliminate a lot of that.

But when drift fishing I use only enuff weight to feel the weight bumping bottom.  I will let out line till I feel the bottom and hold it there.  If it starts planing off the bottom I will let out line till I feel the weight again and adjust as I need.
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« Reply #4 on: April 19, 2007, 02:14:31 PM »

I agree with what has been said by Capt Ed and Irishayes. The only thing I would add is that if you are bottom fishing with mono you will tend to use a heavier weight because of the stretch factor in mono. Mono does stretch, more then you think.

I would suggest you switch over to braided line, power pro or one of the other quality brands that are out there. I use Braid line on all my bottom fishing gear. Braided lines have very little or no stretch in them. Because of this and the smaller diameter you will be able to use a bit lighter weight.

Personally I like going with as little weight as I can yet hold the bottom effectively. That combined with braid line allows my customers to feel a bite much better. Like when a big Flatty is just holding on to the end of a bait. The customer can feel the difference between that and a heavy weight bouncing along. Now they know to let the fish eat the bait, be patient and then when they set the hook because there is no stretch in the braid line the hook set is much better. Positive hook ups.
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ped579
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« Reply #5 on: April 19, 2007, 02:42:21 PM »

Now with surf fishing guys it is all determined by the type of fishing you are doing.  If you are doing the mile long cast with a 14' Wink  rod and then placing the rod in the holder and waiting for something to come along you might start with a 6 oz and if that doesn't hold go up till it does.  Once you find the zone of weight your good to go for the day (conditions do change but not that fast).

Now if you are using a slip sinker that is a whole other story.  This type of rig is very different.  What I would look for first is wind direction and if there is a current running in the slot you're fishing.  I always throw in closest to the direction the wind is blowing this way the sinker usually a 4oz to start, will hold and your line will still slide through the slide and be influenced by the current allowing you to have the bait slide and meander in the current.  Like a fish finder so to speak.

This type of fishing I usually use a 9' - 10' pole or something you are comfortable in holding.  You do not want to put the pole into the holder with this type of fishing.  I find that when the fish strike I want to be able to feel it and make sure the hook is set.  I even do this with a circle hook, old habits die slow I guess.

Good lock Cheesy
« Last Edit: April 19, 2007, 02:44:28 PM by ped579 » Logged



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« Reply #6 on: April 19, 2007, 09:57:19 PM »

Great Input Thanks ALL!!
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Mate Mike
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« Reply #7 on: April 30, 2007, 04:27:52 PM »

If bottom fishing I always use braided line due to it's lack of stretch and it's sensitivity.  As far as determining weight - I let my line drift out a little then I raise my pole, if it settles back down where it was then the weight is good, if it drifts out more then I add weight.
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Capt. Bud
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« Reply #8 on: May 28, 2007, 07:04:26 PM »

That's very good Mike.  I'm impressed
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